creee le 7 mai 2009 et derniere mise a jour le 7 mai 2009

marque

PANOZ

modèle

ROADSTER

finitions

Roadster

année

1 9 9 9

quantité / prix

/ $?

carrosserie

roadster2 portes 2 places

moteur/boite

V8

EBAY MOTORS EN 2006
  • le meilleur concurrent du trombinoscar car il se renouvelle sans cesse! (cliquez sur l'image pour y accéder)

CE QU'EN DIT LE VENDEUR A L'EPOQUE
  • A dépassé les $35000
  • 1999 PANOZ ROADSTER-1k-miles-Shoroom new!
  • Vehicle Description :
    BODY & CHASSIS Layout: Front mid/engine, rear wheel drive, two passenger, two-door roadster. Body: Hand assembled lightweight SPF aluminum. Chassis: Twin-tiered extruded aluminum space frame with steel suspension subframes
    ENGINE/DRIVETRAIN Engine: Hand assembled dual overhead cam, 32-valve, 90-degree aluminum V-8 Displacement: 4.6 Liters/280cid (4,601cc) Horsepower: 305 @ 5,800rpm Torque: 300 @4,800rpm Compression Ratio: 9.85:1 Bore x Stroke: 3.55 in. x 3.54 in. (90.2 mm x 90.0 mm) Fuel Injection: Sequential electronic Ignition: Distributorless, coil-on-plug Transmission: Borg Warner T45 5-speed manual Gear Ratios: 1st: 3.37:1 2nd: 1.99:1 3rd: 1.33:1 4th: 1.00:1 5th: 0.67:1 Rev: 3.22:1 Final: 3.27:1 Differential: Limited-slip type, 8.8-inch ring gear, aluminum case.
    SUSPENSION, WHEELS & TIRES Front: Independent, polished stainless steel Panoz SLA double wishsbone configuration with adjustable coil-over shock absorbers. Rear: Independent, Panoz SLA double wishsbone configuration with adjustable coil-over shock absorbers. Wheels: F: 18x8.5 aluminum BBS 'RK' R: 18x10 aluminum BBS 'RK' Tires: Front: 245/40ZR18 BFGoodrich G-Force Rear: 295/35ZR18 BFGoodrich G-Force BRAKES Type: Four wheel power assisted disc Front: 13-inch vented rotor Rear: 10-inch vented rotor STEERING Type Power assisted rack and pinion Turns lock-to-lock: 2.5 Ratio: 15:1
    DIMENSIONS & CAPACITIES Wheelbase: 104.5 in. Track (f/r): 66.9 in./63.7 in. Overall Length: 159.0 in. Overall Width: 76.75 in. Overall Height: 52.0 in. Ride Height: 5.0 in. Curb Weight: 2,570 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 11.2 gal.
    PERFORMANCE 0-60mph: 4.6sec. Lateral Acceleration 0.97g 700ft (212m) Slalom: 67.0 mph (107.8 km/h) Braking from 60mph: 119 ft. Top Speed: 140 mph EPA Mileage Rating (mpg):
    TECHNOLOGY & PERFORMANCE • Twin Tiered extruded aluminum chassis • Superplastic formed aluminum body • Hand assembled, front/mid-mounted 305bhp, 4.6L aluminum V8 engine with dual overhead camshafts and 32-valves. • Dual 2.5-inch exhaust pipes • Five-speed, short throw manual transmission • Limited-slip differential • Quick ratio power assisted rack-and-pinion steering • Racing inspired, four-wheel independent suspension system with coil-over absorbers. • Four-wheel power assisted disc brakes • Steel braided high-pressure front brake lines
    COMFORT, CONTROLS AND CONVENIENCE • Custom stitched leather seats • Hand stitched removable soft top • Available wood or carbon fiber interior trim • Nardi three-spoke leather wrapped steering wheel • Leather shifter and handbrake boots • Embossed billet aluminum shift knob • CFC-free air conditioning • Variable intermittent wipers • Electronic anti-theft system with ignition immobilization • Central gauge cluster • Full analog backlit instrumentation • Alpine 300-watt AM/FM audio system with In-dash CD player and subwoofer • Day/night rearview mirror • Center-console locking storage binnacle • Driver and passenger door pockets • Visor mounted vanity mirrors • Illuminated foot wells -----------
    SAFETY • Steel side-impact door beams • Inboard three-point safety belts • Collapsible steering linkage • Convex right side rearview mirror • Centrally located fuel tank COLORS AND TRIM Exterior: Black, Red, Blue, Green, Silver, Yellow, Custom Paint-To-Match Interior: Black or Tan MSRP: $64,500 (as of final production March 2000)
  • Vehicle Condition / So now you know about the Panozes. But what about this car of theirs? Three years ago, Danny Panoz improved his original Roadster by replacing its steel-tube-frame chassis with lightweight aluminum. Thus, the A.I.V., or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle, was born. Make no mistake: This was an achievement of no small significance. Due to the cost and difficulty of using aluminum on a production line, the alloy is normally specified only where it's absolutely necessary--such as in aircraft, where light weight literally means getting your product off the ground. Indeed, the challenges of creating an all-aluminum production car were such that Panoz was the first American automaker to sell one (several years earlier, Acura had unveiled the world's first aluminum production automobile--the NSX exotic car). Why the fuss over aluminum? For one thing, it's remarkably strong and stiff, which allows designers to create exciting designs that resist flexing and bending at speed. More important, though, is aluminum's considerable weight savings compared with steel. Whether you're talking about sports cars, jet fighters or tricycles, weight is the enemy of performance. Thanks to its all-aluminum construction, the A.I.V. Roadster weighs just 2,570 pounds--about the same weight class as, say, the Toyota Corolla econo-car. Strong and light is the perfect foundation for speed. Especially when you add the sort of power that would make George W. Bush giddy. Under its long narrow hood, the A.I.V. Roadster hides a massive 32-valve, four-cam, all-aluminum 4.6-liter Ford V-8, the same basic energy source that drives Ford's spicy Mustang Cobra. It's a wonder this engine's muscle doesn't burst open the Roadster's hood at the seams--under the driver's right foot awaits a beastly 305 horsepower. In a featherweight aluminum car like the A.I.V., such rippling force means there's enough performance on tap to yank the ears right off your head. Plant your shoe on the throttle, and this amusing little two-seater can blast from 0 to 60 miles per hour in just 4.6 seconds--enough to humiliate a blue-blooded Porsche 911 Carrera. As a result of the engine's prodigious 300 foot-pounds of torque, immediate forward thrust is available at almost any speed or in any of the Roadster's five manual gears. While you're straining to keep your head upright in the wind blast, your eardrums will be feasting on the sonic cake of a deliciously loud and exhilarating exhaust note. I even had a passerby chase me on foot to a stoplight to ask, "What is that thing? I could hear it a block away--it sounds fantastic!" For sure, aural eroticism is half the fun of a purely sporting machine like the A.I.V. Your eyes may know that you're not driving this Panoz at Le Mans, but your ears will think you're blasting right down the famed Mulsanne Straight. Even if you were to take it on a race-track, you'd find that the A.I.V. was equal to the challenge. Its sophisticated double-wishbone suspension, wide 18-inch tires and light weight (perfectly balanced at the front and rear), makes the Roadster seemingly bite onto the asphalt through turns. Panoz claims that maximum cornering grip is a hair-wrecking 0.97 g--nearly enough to qualify the car as an astronaut training device. The huge ventilated disc brakes (roughly the size of pie plates) are capable of producing equally organ-distorting g-forces during hard stops. Want the kind of attention normally reserved for half-naked movie stars? Then the fast and fabulous Panoz A.I.V. Roadster is for you JOIN ME NOW AS WE travel back to those glorious days of yesteryear, when sports cars were low and uncivilized and so sexy you could easily get your date to ... Wait a minute. I suddenly got this horrible mental image of people watching black-and-white TVs with tinfoil antennas, decorating their backyard bomb shelters and listening to scratchy little Elvis records and thinking, "Can you imagine how awesome this guy is gonna be when he's 50?" Oh, let's not go back to that creepy time. Surely there must be a way to enjoy that classic sports-car feel and have your DVDs, too? The Panoz Auto Development Company has potent evidence that just such a retro/modern driving experience is possible. From its 50-person production facility in Hoschton, Georgia, about 30 miles northeast of Atlanta, Panoz (pronounced PAY-noze) turns out about two examples of its A.I.V. Roadster each week. Low-slung, with an open two-seat cockpit, an audaciously wide and tubular body and front wheels splayed outward like a stalking cat, the A.I.V. certainly has the physique of the hot rods of yore. Inspect the car more closely, though, and you'll notice the sort of leading-edge materials and components you'd find on a contemporary exotic sports car. The result: Like VW's New Beetle, the Panoz A.I.V. Roadster combines a robust vintage flavor with manners thoroughly befitting the fledgling 21st century. Never heard of Panoz? Well, then you're either not a race fan or you don't know diddly about the drug business. The Roadster is the brainchild of Danny Panoz, 39, a well-heeled auto aficionado who founded Panoz Auto Development in 1989 with the notion of developing an exciting sporting machine powered by an American V-8 engine. By 1992, Panoz and two partners had created the first Roadster, a rakish little open-air two-seater with a Ford V-8, a steel-tube chassis and snazzy aluminum bodywork. Building on the impressive start he'd made with his Roadster, in 1997 Danny and his father, pharmaceuticals magnate Don Panoz, formed Panoz Motor Sports. The two men aimed high: They decided to enter one of the world's premier car events, France's 24 Hours of Le Mans. In the 1998 race, Panoz's GTR-1 finished seventh overall and won its class. Successes increased from there. In 1999, the Visteon Panoz LMP-1 wrapped up the Teams and Manufacturers Championships in the American Le Mans Series. The Panoz family lives as well as it drives. The next time you find yourself in Hoschton with a little time on your hands, be sure to visit what amounts to PanozWorld. In addition to the car shops and a new race-driving school, the surrounding family-owned businesses include the superb Road Atlanta racetrack and Chateau Elan, a 16th-century-inspired palace complete with 200-acre vineyard, spa, equestrian center and four golf courses. Continued from page 1 So now you know about the Panozes. But what about this car of theirs? Three years ago, Danny Panoz improved his original Roadster by replacing its steel-tube-frame chassis with lightweight aluminum. Thus, the A.I.V., or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle, was born. Make no mistake: This was an achievement of no small significance. Due to the cost and difficulty of using aluminum on a production line, the alloy is normally specified only where it's absolutely necessary--such as in aircraft, where light weight literally means getting your product off the ground. Indeed, the challenges of creating an all-aluminum production car were such that Panoz was the first American automaker to sell one (several years earlier, Acura had unveiled the world's first aluminum production automobile--the NSX exotic car). Why the fuss over aluminum? For one thing, it's remarkably strong and stiff, which allows designers to create exciting designs that resist flexing and bending at speed. More important, though, is aluminum's considerable weight savings compared with steel. Whether you're talking about sports cars, jet fighters or tricycles, weight is the enemy of performance. Thanks to its all-aluminum construction, the A.I.V. Roadster weighs just 2,570 pounds--about the same weight class as, say, the Toyota Corolla econo-car. Strong and light is the perfect foundation for speed. Especially when you add the sort of power that would make George W. Bush giddy. Under its long narrow hood, the A.I.V. Roadster hides a massive 32-valve, four-cam, all-aluminum 4.6-liter Ford V-8, the same basic energy source that drives Ford's spicy Mustang Cobra. It's a wonder this engine's muscle doesn't burst open the Roadster's hood at the seams--under the driver's right foot awaits a beastly 305 horsepower. In a featherweight aluminum car like the A.I.V., such rippling force means there's enough performance on tap to yank the ears right off your head. Plant your shoe on the throttle, and this amusing little two-seater can blast from 0 to 60 miles per hour in just 4.6 seconds--enough to humiliate a blue-blooded Porsche 911 Carrera. As a result of the engine's prodigious 300 foot-pounds of torque, immediate forward thrust is available at almost any speed or in any of the Roadster's five manual gears. While you're straining to keep your head upright in the wind blast, your eardrums will be feasting on the sonic cake of a deliciously loud and exhilarating exhaust note. I even had a passerby chase me on foot to a stoplight to ask, "What is that thing? I could hear it a block away--it sounds fantastic!" For sure, aural eroticism is half the fun of a purely sporting machine like the A.I.V. Your eyes may know that you're not driving this Panoz at Le Mans, but your ears will think you're blasting right down the famed Mulsanne Straight. Even if you were to take it on a race-track, you'd find that the A.I.V. was equal to the challenge. Its sophisticated double-wishbone suspension, wide 18-inch tires and light weight (perfectly balanced at the front and rear), makes the Roadster seemingly bite onto the asphalt through turns. Panoz claims that maximum cornering grip is a hair-wrecking 0.97 g--nearly enough to qualify the car as an astronaut training device. The huge ventilated disc brakes (roughly the size of pie plates) are capable of producing equally organ-distorting g-forces during hard stops. For all of its ability to mimic a centrifuge, though, the Panoz Roadster is ideal simply for enjoying a leisurely Malibu cruise or a Sunset Boulevard tour. It takes a bit of contorting to angle your legs into the narrow foot wells, but once you're ensconced in the cabin, there's reasonable room for two people. Creature comforts aren't exactly in abundance--there's air conditioning and a 180-watt stereo, but in the open air you'll rarely need the former, and once the wind picks up above 50 mph, you can't hear the latter. (The car comes with a soft top, but spending the 15 minutes required to assemble it makes about as much sense as spending $100 to have a Labrador retriever detailed.) No, the draw here is the sheer exuberance of making your way in such a unique and happy machine, soaking up sun and stares as you motor to the melody of the engine's busy valves, cams and pistons. Because it's fast, rare and hand-built to exacting standards, the A.I.V. Roadster stickers at $64,500. Savvy readers will note that Plymouth sells a similar piece of retro-hot-rod eye candy, the Prowler, for $43,500. Then again, the Panoz will eat a Prowler or a Porsche for lunch and ask for seconds. Which is to say, if you're driving a Panoz A.I.V. Roadster, you'll never be eaten for lunch in this town again. COPYRIGHT 2000 Los Angeles Magazine, Inc

PHOTOS DE LA PANOZ ROADSTER 1999

 

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